Wednesday, August 31, 2011

#8 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
Communications with a Wider Audience
#8. Banners, posters, and displayed communications


 The Veterans for Peace took the Newseum in Washington, DC by surprise with a banner drop both inside and outside. Striking, provocative and effective.
Here is a video of the 2010 action. 
See photos from Flickr | See photos from Ellen Davidson

Monday, August 29, 2011

#7 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
Communications with a Wider Audience
#7. Slogans, caricatures, and symbols 

"Seed Corn Must Not Be Ground."  
The line, borrowed from the author Goethe, became the title of this  final lithograph of German artist, K├Ąthe Kollwitz (1867-1945), and shows clearly her belief in the futility of war and the waste of the sacrifice of the young to violence.

198 Methods of Nonviolent Action compiled by Dr. Gene Sharp and first published in his 1973 book, The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Vol. 2: The Methods of Nonviolent Action. (Boston: Porter Sargent Publishers, 1973). The book outlines each method and gives information about its historical use. You may also download this list of methods.

Saturday, August 27, 2011

#6 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
Formal Statements
#6. Group or mass petitions

Political and social activists have a lot of choices these days when launching a petition campaign. But not all petition sites are created equal.  Read More

198 Methods of Nonviolent Action compiled by Dr. Gene Sharp and first published in his 1973 book, The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Vol. 2: The Methods of Nonviolent Action. (Boston: Porter Sargent Publishers, 1973). The book outlines each method and gives information about its historical use. You may also download this list of methods.

Friday, August 26, 2011

#5 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
  Formal Statements
#5. Declarations of Indictment and Intention 
Click above for a general explanation of #5  from blogger Michael Olschimke

Since its earliest use in the U.S. Constitution indicting King George III for his  "repeated injuries and usurpations" of the Americans' rights and liberties," various groups have made Declarations of  indictment seeking accountability for the crimes of government.  In recent years, Declarations of Indictment have been drafted against George W. Bush and his administration by former US Attorney General Ramsey Clark and by The Center for Constitutional Rights, 
and other International groups.

 The US Court of Appeals ruled on Aug. 9, 2011,  that two U.S. citizens who worked for a private security firm in Iraq can proceed to take Donald Rumsfeld to trial for the torture they assert they endured during months of imprisonment in 2006 in a prison set up by the Pentagon at a military base near Baghdad's airport.
Read report here on Indict BushNow.org



198 Methods of Nonviolent Action were compiled by Dr. Gene Sharp and first published in his 1973 book, The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Vol. 2: The Methods of Nonviolent Action. (Boston: Porter Sargent Publishers, 1973). The book outlines each method and gives information about its historical use. You may also download this list of methods.

Thursday, August 25, 2011

#4 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
Formal Statements
#4- Signed Public Statements
 
SPC Katherine Jashinski, the
first woman in the military to publicly declare resistance to participation in the war:
"My name is Katherine Jashinski. I am a SPC in the Texas Army National Guard. I was born in Milwaukee, WI and I am 22 years old. When I graduated high school I moved to Austin, TX to attend college. At age 19 I enlisted in the Guard as a cook because I wanted to experience military life. When I enlisted I believed that killing was immoral, but also that war was an inevitable part of life and therefore, an exception to the rule.


After enlisting I began the slow transformation into adulthood. Like many teenagers who leave their home for the first time, I went through a period of growth and soul searching. I encountered many new people and ideas that broadly expanded my narrow experiences. After reading essays by Bertrand Russel and traveling to the South Pacific and talking to people from all over the world, my beliefs about humanity and its relation to war changed. I began to see a bigger picture of the world and I started to reevaluate everything that I had been taught about war as a child. I developed the belief that taking human life was wrong and war was no exception. I was then able to clarify who I am and what it is that I stand for.


The thing that I revere most in this world is life, and I will never take another person's life.


Just as others have faith in God, I have faith in humanity I have a deeply held belief that people must solve all conflicts through peaceful diplomacy and without the use of violence. Violence only begets more violence.


Because I believe so strongly in non-violence, I cannot perform any role in the military. Any person doing any job in the Army, contributes in some way to the planning, preparation or implementation of war.


For eighteen months, while my CO status was pending, I have honored my commitment to the Army and done everything that they asked of me. However, I was ordered to Ft. Benning last Sunday to complete weapons training in preparation to deploy for war.


Now I have come to the point where I am forced to choose between my legal obligation to the Army and my deepest moral values. I want to make it clear that I will not compromise my beliefs for any reason. I have a moral obligation not only to myself but to the world as a whole, and this is more important than any contract.


I have come to my beliefs through personal, intense, reflection and study. They are everything that I am and all that I stand for. After much thought and contemplation about the effect my decision will have on my future, my family, the possibility of prison, and the inevitable scorn and ridicule that I will face, I am completely resolute.
I will exercise my every legal right not pick up a weapon, and to participate in war effort. I am determined to be discharged as a CO, and while undergoing the appeals process; I will continue to follow orders that do not conflict with my conscience until my status has been resolved. I am prepared to accept the consequences of adhering to my beliefs.


What characterizes a conscientious objector is their willingness to face adversity and uphold their values at any cost. We do this not because it is easy or popular, but because we are unable to do otherwise. thank you.
Statement made at Ft. Benning, GA on November 17, 2005
In court on May 23, 2006, Katherine was acquitted of the more serious charge of missing movement by design, but pleaded guilty to refusal to obey a legal order. She received a bad conduct discharge and was sentenced to 120 days confinement, with credit for 53 days already served (at Fort Benning), and 20 days off for good behavior. Katherine was released from custody on July 9, 2006.

 

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

#3 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
Formal Statements
# 3. Declarations by organizations and institutions



On September 21st, the International Day of Peace, a proclamation was signed by Mayor Terri Bellamy and presented by Councilwoman Robin Cape ...See 2 minute Video: Asheville Declaration of Peace with Women in Black - YouTube

On Sept. 21, 2011, Peacetown Asheville will present a petition at the Asheville International Day of Peace gathering calling on President Obama to BRING OUR WAR DOLLARS HOME.


198 Methods of Nonviolent Action compiled by Dr. Gene Sharp and first published in his 1973 book, The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Vol. 2: The Methods of Nonviolent Action. (Boston: Porter Sargent Publishers, 1973). The book outlines each method and gives information about its historical use.
You may also download this list of methods.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

#2 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION
Formal Statements
#2. Letters of opposition or support
"...I am writing you today, not asking for forgiveness for what I decided to do, but to give you an idea of what brought me to that decision to leave the Army and speak out against the Occupation...." James Circello, Iraq Veterans Against The War 
Read More: Open Letter to the Government from an AWOL Soldier


198 Methods of Nonviolent Action
These methods were compiled by Dr. Gene Sharp and first published in his 1973 book, The Politics of Nonviolent Action, Vol. 2: The Methods of Nonviolent Action. (Boston: Porter Sargent Publishers, 1973). The book outlines each method and gives information about its historical use.

Monday, August 22, 2011

# 1 of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Direct Action

Nonviolent Protest & Persuasion  (Categorized by Gene Sharp of Albert Einstein Institute
   Formal Statements:  #1 - Public Speeches 
"The calling to speak is often a vocation of agony, but we must speak"  MLK, Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1967 Riverside Church Speech: A Time to Break Silence

 



Tuesday, August 9, 2011

"We Did the Unthinkable..." Hiroshima-Nagasaki

Ralph Hutchison & Libby Johnson at Y-12 - Remembering those who perished. Photo: Jim Toren
"Today in this place, we stand against death. Against the unconscionable idea of a $7.5 billion dollar bomb plant in Oak Ridge. Against the immoral and illegal production of nuclear weapons at this bomb plant... Against the threat of nuclear destruction at every map coordinate toward which these warheads are aimed.

 "We stand against the death of a thousand cuts -- of dreams unrealized, of  hope crushed, of morality corrupted, of history distorted, of peace denied-- by the Bomb, by the policies that continue the global nuclear arms race, by the diversion of our common treasury to build more and more and more bombs and more and more bomb plants."
Ralph Hutchison, August 6, 2011
Oak Ridge Environmental Peace Alliance


Ashes of Hiroshima
 "I hope everyone remembers what we did to Japan. We did the unthinkable, that we don't want done to us. We killed innocent people and that is what war does," 
Laura Sorensen, Asheville, North Carolina, speaking at the birthplace of the Hiroshima bomb in Oak Ridge, Tennessee